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TPLF’s Post Halloween Drama

Film aficionados will tell you that a plot is not a story, rather a series of events providing conflict in the story. A plot is sometimes referred to as the ‘spine’ of a story. Plots are the results of choices made by the characters: the characters take action (or don’t) and events happen as a result. Whether the story is about a quest, comedy, journey or tragedy there are five elements that help create a strong plot. A plot often seems to get confused or conflated with the characters, setting, and theme.

As we shall see below, TPLFs 6-month long drama was not just confusing, with scenes unimaginable in the 21st century, or in any civilized African society, it also feeds into the racist western narrative that Africans are barbaric, and leaders of African Liberations are not fit, to govern the very countries that they liberated. Most importantly, the TPLF drama exposed in real time, a global governance structure that thrives on crisis and underdevelopment in Africa, with entities such as TPLF, as its mercenary tool.

Exposition is the beginning of the story and prepares the way for upcoming events to unfold. It is in this part of the plot, where major characters are introduced, the setting is established, and major conflicts of the story are revealed. In this TPLF drama, the setting is the Tigray region of Ethiopia, a region that bore the brunt of TPLF’s decadence and excesses for the last three decades-a classic example of the “haves and the haves not”. The major characters are the TPLF elite and their henchmen, and the conflict is the rule of law, the TPLFs Achilles heel.

As Americans prepared for Halloween, a celebration observed in many countries on 31 October, by decorating their homes with pumpkins, skulls and ghostlike figures, picking their costumes and buying candy to give to the many that will knock on their doors for “trick or treat”, the TPLF clique was busy preparing for an extended Halloween-like event of its own. Just days after Halloween, on 3 November 2020, TPLF militia snuck up onto the Ethiopian Northern Command with their own version of “Trick or Treat”, killing and wounding many, and robbing their weapons (treat). But the spooky adventures in the pitch of dark, did not end there. TPLF organized a youth gang called “Samri” who massacred over a thousand innocent civilians in MaiKadra. How one trains youth to kill is unimaginable, but in this real life TPLF horror drama, one can only expect the ugliest.

These gangs are not phantom, they are hiding in UN run refugee camps, yet the glaring western media lens, that bears witness to imaginary dramas in Tigray, cannot see things right under their own noses. Rehearsed script on hand, but Tigray remains in their drama lens, reality on the ground in stark contrast.

Turning the lights off in Tigray, TPLF sent the entire region into a hellish nightmare, that has spooked its suffering population, holding them hostage as its marauding militia continue with the scripted rampage.

Rising Action is that point in a movie where the main problem or conflict is revealed. During the point of rising action, the protagonist will struggle to face the conflict which could be internal (protagonist vs. self) or external (protagonist vs. antagonist, protagonist vs. nature/society) and chronicles how the main characters deal with the curveball that comes their way. In this TPLF drama, the conflict is definitely internal. It’s the culmination of a three-decade long ride of absolute lawlessness, kleptocracy and belligerence. The scripted daily wails on cyberspace belie a sinister agenda.

Next scene in the TPLF drama was a story of a fake Axum Church massacre, its ghostwriters spanned the globe. Amnesty International, a fake priest in Boston, Massachusetts, a celebration in Axum and a TPLF head boasting about the city’s liberation, like in the movies, all taking place at the same time.  As that drama played out, the main attraction was the scene on the grand stage, the Security Council in New York.  That scene was a cyber theater box-office flop. The audience was left dizzy.  The ghosts took over Axum before the hyenas came, fumbling the ending, as none was captured on film. All the drama was for naught. Turns out, not all were well versed on TPLF’s scripts and some floundered.

Climax is the turning point in the story, often centered around the protagonist’s most difficult challenge or their bleakest moment. The climax is the most exciting part of the story and initiates a turning point in the characters’ lives. The climax is where the protagonist receives new information, accepts the information – realizes it and may or may not necessarily agrees with it and then acts on that information. TPLF, believing its own lies, has yet to come to terms with its predicament. It is still “waiting for Godot”.

TPLFs drama includes harrowing tales, mimicking its 27-year rule. In this 6-month long saga, the only part it chose for itself, is one of the “victorious” victim. It’s cries for help reached the doorsteps of its patrons, before the drama even began, for they too had a role to play, and as if on cue, when the producers cried roll from their underground hideouts, the bold headlines began. The post Halloween show had begun in earnest. The climatic scenes played out at the UN Security Council, where Council members were relegated to playing in an orchestrated game of charades. The curtains on the bad movie were about to close, and the audience remained numb.

Falling Action is the point that occurs immediately after the climax and reveals the details of the consequences good or bad, that the main characters must deal with after the turning point of events. It sets the stage for the resolution.

TPLFs drama was especially gruesome. There was a scene where the leaders of the TPLF had their heads cut off- supposedly to hide their identity, but knowing their mentality, it was probably more like a moment of “post dead bravado”, to make up for their real-life inferiority complex. Only in a movie would the dead come back to live through an embarrassing episode.

Resolution is the part where the outcome of the event and the fate of the protagonist and antagonists are revealed. This part is where the protagonist resolves the conflicts and the loose ends of the storyline are tied up unless, there is a sequel planned wherein there are cliff hanger scenes to enable further development in the plot line

But TPLFs orchestrated drama did not have a plausible end, or tenable sequels… cliffs, but no cliffhangers. In the end, all that can be said about the drama is that it was suicidal.  The script was ill-conceived and downright stupid from the get go. One that only a warped TPLF mind could conjure. From their bunkers and hideouts, the producers of the drama egged the civilian props to serve as human shield, while others in faraway lands handed out props and scripts for, the “let’s see who rolls the best” shows in European citadels. Rolling on the ground and howling like human zombies to the delight of the western audience. 

There were scenes in the TPLF drama that did not quite fit in, making the scenes even more incoherent.  The dramatists were themselves playing their desired imaginary roles, to dress up like an Eritrean. But even in the drama, they could not mimic the Eritrean soldier, after all, it is not the “accent” or the “uniform” that makes one an Eritrean soldier, it’s the ingrained discipline and culture defined for generations, that is his/her characteristic. TPLF props can pretend to play the role of the Eritrean soldier, but it would not be an act that it can deliver, even in a Halloween scene, let alone in a battle.

Were it not for Ethiopia’s sons and daughters, and friends in neighboring states, Ethiopia would have been engulfed in an intractable conflict with a venomous clique creating unfathomable drama, leaving blood trails of the innocent, wherever it goes.

TPLF committed suicide…the walking dead (TPLF surrogates) will have to relive the horror for generations to come. 

THE END

Zerai Solomon 

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